R7 Zoning NYC, R7-1 Zoning, & R7-2 Zoning

R7 Zoning NYC

R7 Zoning NYC, R7-1 Zoning, & R7-2 Zoning

(Last Updated On: November 23, 2018)

R7 is a medium density residential zoning district. R7 Zoning is found commonly in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan. This article will focus on basic R7 Zoning districts including R7-1 Zoning & R7-2 Zoning. We will not be going into the contextual districts see list below. We have separate blog posts for those.

 

R7 Zoning Districts

Basic R7 Districts

  • R7-1 Zoning
  • R7-2 Zoning

R7 Contextual Districts

 

COMMERCIAL ZONING WITH RESIDENTIAL EQUIVALENT R7-2 ZONING

Most Commercial Zoning districts allow for residential use. Below are Commercial zones with R7-2 Residential Equivalents.

 

WHAT IS R7 ZONING?

R7-1 Zoning & R7-2 Zoning

R7 Zoning is considered medium density residential. It is broken into 2 basic zoning districts R7-1 and R7-2. R7 zoning has multifamily buildings that can be low rise to somewhat taller apartment buildings. In an R7 zone you have 2 options for zoning regulations you can use Height Factor Zoning or Quality Housing Program.

For the most part R7-1, R7-2 are almost identical in their zoning characteristics. The only difference is that R7-2 (Common in Upper Manhattan) has less parking requirements. All requirements except parking will follow the R7 Zoning Regulations.

 

Height Factor for R7 Zones

Height factor is one set of zoning regulations that promotes building taller skinnier buildings. There are proportional requirements governing the height and size of the building. The taller the building gets the less area it can cover on the site, basically the taller it gets the skinnier it needs to be with more open space on the property.

R7 Height Factor Example:

A 7 story building in R7-2 Zoning would have a Floor Area Ratio of 3.05 If you went to 14 Stories you would get the maximum Floor Area Ratio of 3.44

Number Of StoriesOpen Space RatioFloor area Ratio
115.50.87
2161.52
316.52.01
4172.38
517.52.67
6182.88
718.53.05
8193.17
919.53.27
10203.33
1120.53.38
12213.41
1321.53.42
14223.44
1522.53.42
16233.41
1723.53.4
18243.38
1924.53.36
20253.33
2125.53.3
Over 21 Stories25.5 + .5 per story over 21HF FAR Formula

 

Quality Housing Program for R7 Zones

The quality housing program is probably more common in R7 zones and in fact is required in R7 contextual zones. The quality housing program promotes shorter wider buildings. This is not to be confused with the Inclusionary Housing Program for affordable housing. The quality housing program is just another set of optional zoning regulations and has nothing to do with low income or affordable housing. The quality housing program typically will result in a larger building of a higher quality. There are more zoning floor area deductions in quality housing that would give you a boost to your total building size.

Typically I recommend using the Quality Housing Program regulations. Below you will see a general zoning analysis example of an R7-2 Zoning building for Quality Housing Program rules.

 

R7 ZONING COMMUNITY FACILITY

R7 Zoning is a residential zone but Community Facility uses are allowed in all R7. In the instance of a community facility the zoning calculations would be different. One can also build a mixed use building with both community facility and residential use.

 

R7 ZONING COMMERCIAL OVERLAY

Sometimes residential districts have commercial overlays. this means the zone is primarily residential but commercial use is allowed instead or you can have both as a mixed use building. Here is a link to an article we wrote on Commercial Overlays.

 

R7 Inclusionary Housing Program

Always check if your property is in an Inclusionary Zoning District. These are districts that have either optional and sometimes mandatory requirements for low income housing. Typically in these areas you provide 20% of your floor area for affordable units. There can be zoning penalties if you choose not to provide it.

 

R7 Zoning Regulations For Quality Housing

R7-1 and R7-2 will follow all of the following regulations up to the parking section which is the only real difference.

Lot Size:

Minimum Lot width =18 Feet

Minimum Lot Area = 1,700 Sq Ft

Lot Coverage:

Corner Lot = 80%

Interior or Through Lot = 65%

Floor Area Ratio (FAR):

Manhattan Core: = 3.44

Everywhere Else:

Narrow street  = 3.44

Wide street = 4.0

Density Factor

680 – This factor determines how many apartments are allowed. See examples below.

Building Base Height: This indicates a setback is required at these heights

Manhattan Core: = 40 Minimum / 60 Maximum

Everywhere Else:

Narrow street  = 40 Minimum / 60 Maximum

Wide street = 40 Minimum / 65 Maximum

Overall Building Height: This is the actual building height

Manhattan Core: = 75 feet

Everywhere Else:

Narrow street  = 75 feet

Wide street = 80 feet

Yards:

Corner Lot: No Yards Required

Interior Lot = 30 foot minimum rear yard required

 

R7 Zoning Example

Lets do an example analysis. Zoning is complicated and I am only addressing the basics here. I assure you there are many additional issues and variations to consider beyond this example.

R7-2 Zoning Example Lot

Lets assume we have a 100 x 100 property in R7-2 Zoning in Harlem on an interior lot. This property is outside of the Manhattan Core and we will assume it is on a wide street.

Building Foot Print:

First Lets start with Lot Coverage and Yards. We know we will need a minimum rear yard of 30 feet. That tells us we have 100 x 70 to build on. Except that we can only cover 65% of the property. So lets build from Side lot line to side lot line for the full 100 feet but lets only go 60 feet deep (we could go 65 but lets do 60 for this example). This will result in a 40 foot rear yard.

Zoning Floor Area/ Floor Area Ratio (FAR)

So the floor area ratio on a wide street outside the Manhattan Core is 4. The FAR is a ratio that determines how many square feet you can build on the property. You simply take the property size and multiply it by the FAR.

In this example: FAR of 4 and lot of 100 feet x 100 feet.

Zoning Floor Area = Lot Area X FAR

Lot Area = 100 x 100

Lot Area = 10,000 sq ft

FAR = 4.0

Zoning Floor Area = 10,000 sq ft x 4

Zoning Floor Area = 40,000 sq ft

So we can build a 40,000 sq ft building.

We said our building foot print would be 65 x 100. Or 6,000 per floor.

This will give us a 7 Story Building. Because the maximum base height is 65 feet we will at minimum need a setback for the top floor.

How many apartments can we build on our R7-2 lot?

Zoning regulates the maximum number of residential units you can put in a building. In this apartment building we have 40,000 zoning square feet. We then take the zoning Area and divide by the Density factor.

Number Of Apartments = Zoning Floor Area ÷ Density Factor

Number Of apartments = 40,000 ÷ 680

Number Of Apartments = 58.82 we can round up in this case

Maximum Number Of apartments = 59

R7-2 Zoning Example Conclusion

In this example we are proposing to build a 40,000 sq ft building. The apartment building will be 7 stories tall and have a setback at the top floor or lower. The Building will have a foot print of 100 x 60. It will have a maximum of 59 apartments but can have less as well.

 


Thank You for reading our post on R7 Zoning in NYC.

I hope this was helpful. If you want to discuss a specific project with an architect please feel free to Contact Fontan Architecture. We will be happy to help. Or you can check out our Zoning Analysis Services.

 

New York Architects, Jorge Fontan

Author Jorge Fontan AIA

This post was written by Jorge Fontan, a Registered Architect and owner of Fontan Architecture.

6 Comments

  • Matt

    August 23, 2018 5:27 pm
    Reply

    Many thanks for your blog, it is very informational! I have an interior (not corner) vacant lot in West Harlem that is zoned as R7-2 that I would like to build on. However, based on what I read here, it doesn’t meet zoning requirements for a multi-family development, as the lot is approximately 17′ wide x 69′ long. The lot is located between 4 story brownstones, on a non- landmarked brownstone block. The lot is taxed as V1. I am exploring building a multi-family building, and am also curious about modular housing as an option. I am not sure at the moment what the limits are on potential building size for this space, hence, I came across your blog, which seems to indicate maybe only a single-family or 2-family house could be built. Thanks!

  • Chris Giannikouros

    November 14, 2018 4:53 pm
    Reply

    This is a great blog. In an R7-1 25×100 do u need leave side yards, or you can build on the property lines, side to side??

  • John Suarez

    November 20, 2018 3:59 am
    Reply

    I own a house that sits on a 25 x 100 lot but I also own the next lot which I use for parking. It is also 25 x 100. I have had a few people ask me to sell but the offers seem low. What can a developer build on a 50 x 100 lot? My area is zoned R7-1(2). I was told by another neighbor that developers can put up almost a 30 apt building? Is this true?

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